Posts filed under 'Engagement'

GIFT Conference Online

gift-logo-small

Did you miss the GIFT conference in February? Would like to see the sessions you attended again? Maybe there were sessions you really wanted to attend happening at the same time?

The GIFT Conference is now Online.

Videos and notes from the conference are now available in a GIFT eLearn course available for self-registration.

To register for the GIFT eLearn course: click on “Self Registration” in the navbar; click on “GIFT (Great Ideas for Teaching)” in the list of courses; then click on the “Register“ button.
The GIFT course will appear in you “Employee” Tab under “My Courses”.

Add comment March 24th, 2015

Musings on the Myths and the Marvels of the Flipped Classroom

Flipping the classroom is gaining momentum for a variety of reasons. In K-12, teachers’ desire to facilitate and ignite students through the more challenging application and analysis phases motivates the flip. Traditionally, teachers provided the foundation or introduction in class and then assigned the practice and extension activities as homework.  The flip allows them to be present for the more challenging aspects of learning (and teaching!).

In higher education, an additional catalyst for the flip is hybrid or blended learning. As higher ed institutions work to increase students’ responsibility for their own learning, provide more flexibility, and grapple with space issues, flipping the classroom is a popular re-design for blended or hybrid delivery.

For the purposes of the blog, I’ll provide a few musings on the myths and marvels that I believe will benefit Mohawk faculty and students. We will start off with one myth buster and one marvel that assists the bust…..

Myth #1: So, I just have to record myself doing my 2 hour lecture and post it?

For student engagement and retention, you will still want to package the information in to manageable chunks. Likely, in your lectures, you take breaks to confirm understanding every 7-10 minutes. This should be replicated online.

If you are concerned about the best way to build your facilitation of course foundational or introductory information, Richard E. Mayer, an educational psychologist, and Ruth Colvin Clark, an instructional designer, have done some wonderful exploration into the science of eLearning. Their cognitive load and design principles research provides recommendations on combining formats (text, audio, video, animation) to optimize processing and knowledge acquisition by students. Get the book at Mohawk Library! If you had to place a hold on the book, this article will whet your appetite.

Marvel #1: With the omni-patient computer it is actually easier to provide appropriate reinforcement of concepts for all learning styles and preferences in the online learning environment. There are many, free educational technologies that can assist. Let’s highlight one of my favourites - Quizlet.

Have terms and definitions or pictures and definitions that would normally have students creating flashcards to commit them to memory? This tool allows you or students to enter the terms | pictures and definitions once and create not only interactive flashcards, but simultaneously other, scaffolded games | challenges.

Take a look at the Quizlet below. I have entered the names of your CTL frontline staff and their titles | areas of responsibilities. I have chosen the Scatter mode. This mode assumes some level of knowledge. If you are new to Mohawk, you may choose the flashcard mode. If you are a regular user, try the harder, Space Race mode.

Your frontline CTL staff

[Note: CTL staff also includes Anna Johnston (Director), Nadine Ogborn (Manager), and Kelly Riley-Dunbavin (Promotions and Events). But we wanted to keep the game manageable and 8 is the magic number!]

Track your time and challenge your colleagues!

Stay tuned for more myths and marvels of the flipped classroom. In the meantime, if you want to continue the conversation or start a collaboration, contact Peggy French.

Wordle of flipped classroom terms

Add comment January 21st, 2015

Space Design Pedagogy

Constructivist Learning Spaces
There has been a shift in learning pedagogy for teaching practices to follow student-centred, constructivist methods (Long,& Ehrmann 2005). Constructivist methods, and more specifically, social constructivist methods advocate that knowledge is constructed through the active participation of individuals and crowds. If we compare what we know now about learning to our current institutional infrastructure, one can recognize that they often do not parallel each other; the infrastructure we have now is a legacy of what we didn’t know about teaching.

Mohawk is leading the way in space design pedagogy. Yes, there are classrooms that still need to be updated, but that takes time. If we consider our collaboratory, student learning commons, and alternative gathering spaces, our students, faculty, and staff are fortunate to have access to such spaces.

The Mohawk Collaboratory

Mohawk Collaboratory Source Mohawk College 2014

Mohawk Collaboratory: Source Mohawk College 2014

Lomas & Johnson (2005) have offered an alternative design method to the traditional approach to space design. They have propose the CDIO process (conceive, design, implement, operate), in which the learning environment is not viewed as space that needs to be redesigned but rather a “product” which needs to be developed. Following this CDIO process, we can ask the questions, “What kind of a space will produce creative and innovate thinking? What kind of space will support social constructivist learning pedagogy?”

Our learning collaboratory is just that. The traditional library has gone through a transformative change as students are less likely to browse the stacks for books when research and articles can be accessed digitally. Conversely, the modern library “speaks not of books, but of information: pellets of useable data, as smooth, precise, and indistinguishable as the screens themselves”. Yes, books still play an important role and will always have a space in our institutions. However, the modern idea of individual and collaborative learning space is considered to be just as critical. Bennett (2005, as cited in Bailin, 2011) notes that “flexible and responsive space
among students”. This idea is reflected in our learning Collaboratory as the space accommodates a variety of uses and learning styles.

The Mansueto Library, Chicago

Mansueto Library, University of Chicago: Source University of Chicago

Mansueto Library, University of Chicago: Source University of Chicago


Mohawk College is not alone in their thinking. The Mansueto Library at the University of Chicago is a state-of-the-art facility that epitomizes the modern library. It combines learning space and print resources on site. The learning space, which holds up to 180 users, is designed for quiet study and consists of fifteen four-person tables, four long rows of reading tables, and seven interconnected four-person tables. The books are housed in an underground storage facility; students make a digital request, the automated book retrieval system locates the book, and the user is notified that the book is ready for pickup. The process is designed to take less than five minutes. A video explaining the process can be found here.

Considering all of this, Mohawk is in fairly exalted company and is at the forefront of space design pedagogy. We are putting students first and are on our way from moving from good to great.

Lauren Soluk - CTL

References

  • Bennett, S. (2007). First questions for designing higher education learning spaces. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 33(1), 14-26.
  • Mohawk College. (2014). Collaboratory. Retrieved from http://collaboratory.mohawkcollege.ca/.
  • Doorley, S. & Witthoft, S. (2012). Make space. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  • Lomas, C.P. & Johnson, C. (2005). Design of the learning space: Learning design and Principles. EDUCAUSE Review, 40 (4), 16-28. Retrieved from http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERM0540.pdf.
  • Long, P. D., & Ehrmann, S. C. (2005). Future of the learning space, breaking out of the box. EDUCAUSE Review, 40(4), 42-58. Retrieved from http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERM0542.pdf.

For further reading:

  • Doorley, S. & Witthoft, S. (2012). Make space. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  • OWP/P Architects, VS Furniture and Bruce Mau Design. (2010). The third teacher. China:Abrams.
  • Moore, A.H., Watson, E. & Fowler, S.B (2007) Active learning and technology: Designing change for faculty, students and institutions. EDUCAUSE Review, 42 (5), 42-61. Retrieved from http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/active-learning-and-technology-designing-change-faculty-students-and-institutions
  • Lomas, C.P. & Johnson, C. (2005). Design of the learning space: Learning design and Principles. EDUCAUSE Review, 40 (4), 16-28. Retrieved from http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERM0540.pdf.

Add comment January 13th, 2015

Creating a Blend: Enabling Virtual Learners by Design pt 4

It’s been a while since we started this series, but we’ve come back to it.
In the fourth of her blog posts on Enabling Virtual Learners by Design Jennifer Hofmann discusses getting the right blend in blended learning.

We have many options available to us when creating blended training programs. We can build self-paced programs using learning portals, websites, and e-learning. We can develop moderated discussions using social media, discussion boards and email. Finally, we can create real time events using traditional classrooms, videoconferencing, and virtual classrooms. The trick is learning what technologies to use and how to facilitate the blend.

Hoffman points out that while everyone is talking about building the right blend, achieving it requires work; specifically instructional design work; and time to facilitate successful blended learning experiences.

With traditionally delivered courses we often short-cut Instructional design because we feel familiar enough with the medium that we can anticipate how exercises will go, how the audience will respond and what instructional strategies to use; and how to adapt rapidly if the unanticipated occurs.

The online environment doesn’t allow for that.

Instructional Design Basics
Hoffman says designing online learning starts with the basics of Learning Outcomes and assessment techniques.

Once you’ve identified the performance objectives and assessment techniques, think about how you would assess that objective in the online environment. A multiple-choice test? Written essay? Oral feedback? Group application? If the assessment technique is individualized and objective in nature, such as a graded test, then that objective may be effectively delivered asynchronously. If performance is best assessed in an oral or group situation, such as giving effective feedback to a peer, a synchronous delivery method might be most effective for that part of your program.

Keep to the point
A really interesting point she makes is that it is tempting to put background, historical “nice to know” information into the online content. This is a bad idea; if you’re not going to test it, don’t teach it is the rule for online. Why? Maintaining motivation and engagement is a major challenge online. Students need to feel that what they are doing online is directly relevant to what they are trying to achieve or they will lose interest.

There’s a lot more to her challenging and thought provoking article so check it out at this link

Add comment January 5th, 2015

The Educational Support Program: FutureReady at Mohawk

People often talk about the difference between college and university, mainly discussing the difference in hands-on learning. After years of student and work experience at the university level, I have had the opportunity as an Instructional Designer in the CTL to see firsthand what Mohawk is doing right. This doesn’t mean that universities aren’t doing great things because they are! It’s just exciting to see these principles executed in the college environment with a high degree of competency.

You Learn We Grow

You Learn We Grow

Authentic Learning Experiences
Authentic experience is dynamic and engages multiple senses as it “aims to demonstrate the knowledge and skill within a real setting and allow the learner to make connections between the school setting and the demands of the broader communities” (Mantei & Kervin, 2009, p. 4). The balance between applied theoretical and applied learning varies from program to program with some having significantly more ‘hands-on’ and other more ‘theory.’ While theory plays an integral role in student learning, the combination of theory and authentic learning experiences provides a unique opportunity for learning, understanding, and application.

The Educational Support Program
The Educational Support Program (ESP) here at Mohawk is a prime example of the perfect blending of theory and authentic learning. Years ago, the program was mainly theory based, as are a lot of institutional programs. For example, my undergraduate teaching and education program was mainly theory based with placements until the later years. While theory and in-class learning still play a critical role in student learning, in the ESP, the students are carefully and methodically scaffolded into community placements starting in semester one. Karen Falls, a professor for the ESP, shares that students in semester one are paired with CICE students (great co-blending of programs if I might add) to experience educational support in an authentic, yet secure environment. This provides instructors with the ability to able to pop in and out and provide guidance along the way. In the next three semesters, the students experience three different types of placements in the community. They must work in an elementary school classroom, a high-school classroom, and a specialized classroom, which all offer unique experiences to develop their ES skill-set.

A Rich Student Experience
This opportunity aligns well with Jonassen, Mayes, and McAleese (1992) learning continuum where students’ experience unique introductory, advanced and expert learning phases (as cited in Keppell et al., 2002, p. 2). The students in ESP experience introductory learning through classroom learning, advanced learning through first semester CICE preparatory placement, and expert learning through authentic community placements. Combined, the theory matched with the authentic learning opportunities provide for a rich student experience that equally prepares them for the workforce.

Here are Mohawk, we strive to be great and FutureReady. The ESP, and many other programs here, do just that as our graduates are ripe with experience when they leave the college doors.

References:
Alp, A. (2013). How to successful integrate technology into the 21st century classroom – part 1: Web tools. Retrieved from http://aysinalp.edublogs.org/about/

Keppell, M., Kan, K., Messer, L. B., & Bione, H. (2002). Proceedings from ASCILITE 2002: Authentic learning interactions: Myth or reality? Auckland: New Zealand.

Mantei, J. & Kervin, L. K. (2009). Proceedings from National Conference for Teachers of English and Literacy: “Authentic” learning experiences: what does this mean and where is the literacy learning? Hobart, Tasmania: Australia.

Lauren Soluk - Centre for Teaching and Learning

Add comment September 25th, 2014

Make the Most of The First Day of Class

Another September and a new academic year begins. A good time to revisit some ways to make that first class effective.
Incorporating the objectives listed in this article from  Carnegie Melon University are a sure way to start the class off on the right foot. 

The first class meeting should serve at least two basic purposes:
• To clarify all reasonable questions students might have relative to the course objectives, as well as your expectations for their performance in class. As students leave the first meeting, they should believe in your competence to teach the course, be able to predict the nature of your instruction, and know what you will require of them.
• To give you an understanding of who is taking your course and what their expectations are.
These two basic purposes expand into a set of eight concrete objectives:
1. Orchestrate positive first impressions
2. Introduce yourself effectively
3. Clarify learning objectives and expectations
4. Help students learn about each other
5. Set the tone for the course
6. Collect baseline data on students’ knowledge and motivation
7. Whet students’ appetite for course content
8. Inform students of course requirements

To read more about each of the eight concrete objectives, click here.
http://www.cmu.edu/teaching/designteach/teach/firstday.html

What are your strategies for that first day?

Add comment September 2nd, 2014

Cooperation, Coordination, Collaboration: Enabling Virtual Learners by Design. Pt 3

In the third of her blog posts on Enabling Virtual Learners by Design Jennifer Hofmann expands on the subject of collaboration in online learning, and how we can make online learning a collaborative experience.

“The Learning & Development community has realized that simply using technology to create training isn’t enough. Instead, we need to design virtual and blended programs that encourage participants to collaborate. That’s all well and good, but what is online collaboration really? Why is it important? How do we achieve it? “

In try to answer this question, she identifies a clear goal for online collaboration.

“When collaborating online, using asynchronous and synchronous online tools, participant groups should be able to get results (solve problems, create project plans, design projects, and so forth) that are better than the results they would have gotten working individually.
Participants can collaborate and help one another reach learning goals in a variety of ways, both synchronous and asynchronous. They provide feedback, answer questions, and work as a distributed group.”

Fundamentally, Hoffman states, we want participants to collaborate for two reasons:

    Collaboration to achieve participant engagement.

  • Using collaboration to encourage participants to learn is always necessary. When participants know that they’ll need to be able demonstrate what they’ve learned, they tend to stay more engaged. Interaction must include collaborative exercises that ask participants to do more than simply click on a poll answer or raise a hand.
    Collaboration to support learning outcomes.

  • Although all programs should offer some of level of collaboration in order to keep participants engaged, you also may need to create collaborative exercises that support the actual learning goals. This is necessary because online programs often focus on teaching people collaborative skills, such as project management, team building, problem solving and interpersonal skills. These skills are performed in a collaborative social context, so interactions and exercises need to be designed to support the ultimate collaborative goal.

Three Levels of Collaboration
Hoffman identifies three levels of collaboration: Cooperation, Coordination, and True Collaboration.

    Cooperation
    Exercises that are cooperative in nature largely support individual learning goals, and participants tend to be concerned with the results of their personal assessments. If participants are asked to provide feedback or help someone else, they will–as long as it doesn’t affect their personal performance.
    Coordination
    Coordination occurs when participants start to work together as a group to achieve a common goal. They plan and assign tasks, create deadlines, and deliver a common product (presentation, report, set of answers, and so forth). Although individuals are still concerned with their own performance and assessment, they’re willing to work with a group when it supports their personal goals. If one group member starts to fall behind or fails to support the overall group effort, individuals within that group may decide to strike out on their own to ensure personal success.
    True collaboration
    When the success of the group is paramount and all individuals must contribute to that success, you have true collaboration. No group member can be left behind and everyone within the group will do whatever it takes to reach the common goal. This is a very altruistic form of interaction and strongly supports collaboration as a learning outcome.

Collaborative approaches are learner-centered and support the concept that learning is a process rather than an event. There is a hope that once participants become accustomed to collaborating, online, they may start to incorporate more collaborative techniques into their daily interactions. It’s conceivable that participants in online programs may continue to assist each other long after the initial learning experience; ultimately, creating a learning community.

The full blog post with examples of each can be found HERE.

Add comment August 26th, 2014

Making the Most of Professional Development Days

It’s springtime, and college faculty’s naturally turn to thoughts of… PD.
In her Faculty Focus Blog Maryellen Weimer discusses the effectiveness of PD activities and workshops and how we can do better.

The research we looked at then did not give workshops very high marks. If teachers changed, they did so right after the event, but soon reverted to their old ways of doing things
A lot of workshops (mine included) have a kind of revival service feel to them. The faculty who are there care deeply about teaching; those who need to be revived don’t usually show up. So, the audience isn’t all that difficult to convert. If you’ve got an idea they think might be good, especially if it addresses a problem that concerns them, they write it down or key it in, often nodding with gusto and then following up with questions on the details. Give them five or six concrete ideas and they become true believers, whole new teachers who leave the session determined to lead new and better lives in the classroom. But it’s the staying power of workshop experiences that give me pause.

She suggests faculty take time for reflection, to “interrogate their practices” and ask “How?” “What?” and “Why?” questions. For some, that can happen in an organized workshop, but…

there are some of us who just don’t learn very well in those kinds of settings. Give me a quiet space, some good articles, time to write, and a chance to share ideas with my best colleagues—I’ll opt for that almost every time.

So; how ever you want to do it; find some time to think, to question, and to rejuvenate.

Read the full article at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-professor-blog/making-professional-development-days/#sthash.P9h3O6A1.dpuf

Leslie Marshall ~ CTL

Add comment May 21st, 2014

Education Technology Strategies 2014: Summit in Toronto (March 4th & 5th)

A small, but mighty contingent of Mohawk educators - including support staff, administration, and faculty attended this fourth annual conference. From across the country, contributors to K-12 and post-secondary education met to:

Unlock technology to enrich and personalize learning. Reform your organization as part of a progressive ecosystem to nurture engaged students and catalyze innovation.

At this unique forum, obtain strategic insights from education leaders on how to improve student achievements with meaningful use of technology. Acquire cost-effective deployment solutions and incorporate sound pedagogical practices into your curriculum design and delivery.

Benefit from first-hand experience to implement blended, mobile, and BYOD initiatives at your institution and classes. Empower educators with practical tools and techniques to prepare your students for the 21st century knowledge economy.

Improve engagement, maximize learning outcomes and increase retention. Capitalize on emerging innovations to make a dramatic difference to the quality of your education. Adapt to the new paradigm and strive for excellence”

~ Source: Conference site

I thought I would start by adding my Glog or interactive poster that can act as a springboard to more conversation and community building. I am hopeful other attendees will add their takeaways and Mohawk’s community will pose questions and comments.

Here’s my GLOG!

Add comment March 10th, 2014

Are You ‘Present’ in Your Online Courses?

(Re-post)
A paper from Inter American University of Puerto Rico highlights that an important factor in students’ satisfaction with online learning is the Social Presence of their teacher. Social Presence is defined as “the degree to which a person is perceived as a ‘real person’ in a mediated communication context” - the sense that there is someone there at the other end of the computer.
Social Presence promotes participation, integration and cohesion in the online community. It contributes to student motivation, and is associated with retention and completion rates in onlne courses.

How do we create a Social Presence in our courses and encourage students to be ‘there’ too?

Studies have focused on two types of indicators of Social Presence: Affective and Cohesive.

The Affective indictors of Social Presence include:

  • Conventional or unconventional expressions of
    emotion, including the use of repetitious punctuation,
    conspicuous capitalization, and emoticons.
  • Use of humor through teasing, use of irony,
    understatement, and sarcasm.
  • Self- disclosure evidenced in the inclusion of
    details of life outside the class or by expressing
    vulnerability.

Simple things like responses such as “good job!” “Success!” to discussions as well as more formal feedback; comments such as “you’ve made it to the end of Unit 1, now take a break before we start Unit 2″; or having a profile in the course that discloses something about your ‘real’ life (I usually find posting a photo of my dog works gets a positive response). These help create your Social Presence and encourage students to develop their own presence in response.

We’ll look at the Cohesive Indicators of Social Presence in a follow-up post, but in the meantime - what are methods do you use to create your Social Presence?

Add comment January 7th, 2014

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